American Sign Language Studies

Certificate - 17 credits

About this program
The American Sign Language (ASL) Studies certificate provides students with a basic knowledge of American Sign Language and Deaf Culture. The curriculum provides a foundation for entry into a career in a deafness-related field and prepares students for continued educational studies in more advanced preparation for ASL interpreter certification. This program does not prepare students to become interpreters.
Program outcomes
  1. Recognize the difference between deafness as a culture of an American linguistic minority as opposed to solely a medical condition.
  2. More effectively communicate with deaf and hard-of-hearing people in a variety of settings (e.g. health and human service settings).
  3. Demonstrate basic conversational skills and use of appropriate American Sign Language vocabulary, finger spelling, and numbers.
  4. Be prepared to meet the ASL prerequisites for sign language interpreter programs.
Accreditation
Minnesota State Community and Technical College is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission, a regional accreditation agency recognized by the U.S. Department of Education. More information can be found at www.minnesota.edu/accreditation.
Tracks

Curriculum overview

Credits Requirement type
17 Required courses
17 Total

American Sign Language Studies - Certificate

Required Courses:

Subj. Number Course Credits
ASL1111 American Sign Language and Deaf Culture I 3
ASL1112 American Sign Language and Deaf Culture II 3
ASL1113 American Sign Language and Deaf Culture III 4
ASL1114 American Sign Language and Deaf Culture IV 4
COMM2230 Intercultural Communication 3
Plans

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1st Fall Term - 9 credits

Subj. Number Course Credits
ASL1111 American Sign Language and Deaf Culture I 3
ASL1112 American Sign Language and Deaf Culture II 3
COMM2230 Intercultural Communication 3

1st Spring Term - 8 credits

Subj. Number Course Credits
ASL1113 American Sign Language and Deaf Culture III 4
ASL1114 American Sign Language and Deaf Culture IV 4